Construction Engineering and Inspection Jobs—Career Paths with Staying Power

According to the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of construction and building inspectors is projected to grow eight percent from 2014 to 2024.1

Are you detail oriented, have some mechanical knowledge, communicate well, and enjoy a changing work landscape? Then perhaps a career in construction engineering and inspection (CEI) is right for you.

On a construction project, construction engineering and inspection teams are responsible for the verification of materials testing and recording, while the contractor is responsible for building the project in accordance with the plans and specifications. Together, they are responsible for quality control on all aspects of a construction project.

Through hands-on inspections, tests, and questions, construction inspectors check projects for compliance with laws, codes, and regulations. Check out our Projects page to see some real-life examples of GAI’s construction engineering and inspection work.

Below we highlight some of the career options available in construction. While a college degree isn’t required for some positions, it opens the door for greater opportunity for advancement. You may also be required to become licensed or certified for a particular job—depending on local or regional laws and your place of employment.

Learn more about jobs as a:

CEI Project Administrator
CEI Senior Project Engineer
CEI Senior Inspector
Contractor Superintendent
Contractor Project Manager
Contractor Foreman

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GAI is dedicated to safeguarding our clients’ interests and the construction integrity of their projects. Resident engineers, construction engineers, specialists, and technicians skillfully address private and government clients’ distinct construction challenges. As our clients’ eyes and ears, GAI provides quality control and cost protection throughout the construction process. GAI works extensively with state agencies, municipalities, institutions, and private developers.

Learn more about GAI’s construction engineering and inspection and related services.


Sources

1Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2016-17 Edition, Construction and Building Inspectors, on the Internet at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/construction-and-extraction/construction-and-building-inspectors.htm (visited January 18, 2017).

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